Showing all 5 results for Peter Ackroyd

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Dan Leno Limehouse Golem Cook Pro

By Peter Ackroyd

As Elizabeth Cree sits every day in a courtroom, on trial for the murder of her husband, the story moves from courthouse to music hall to the back alleys of Limehouse, the notorious district of Victorian London, teeming with the poorest of the poor, the most violent of criminals and helpless preyed upon immigrants, following the trail of + Read More..
As Elizabeth Cree sits every day in a courtroom, on trial for the murder of her husband, the story moves from courthouse to music hall to the back alleys of Limehouse, the notorious district of Victorian London, teeming with the poorest of the poor, the most violent of criminals and helpless preyed upon immigrants, following the trail of slaughter laid by the Golem, an almost mythical predecessor of Jack the Ripper.

Fact and fiction blend effortlessly as Dan Leno, king of the music-hall comedians is dragged unwittingly into the investigation of one of London’s most notorious murders. When Karl Marx and George Gissing are connected to the same crime the possibilities are endless.
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London Under: The Secret History Beneath the Streets

By Peter Ackroyd

From the author of the bestselling London: The Biography, a poetic and powerful urban history of life and legend beneath London.

This is a wonderful, atmospheric, historical, imaginative, oozing little study of verything that goes on under London, from original springs and streams and Roman amphitheatres to Victorian sewers and gang hide-outs. The depth below is hot, much + Read More..
From the author of the bestselling London: The Biography, a poetic and powerful urban history of life and legend beneath London.

This is a wonderful, atmospheric, historical, imaginative, oozing little study of verything that goes on under London, from original springs and streams and Roman amphitheatres to Victorian sewers and gang hide-outs. The depth below is hot, much warmer than the surface and this book tunnels down through the geological layers, meeting the creatures that dwell in darkness, real and fictional -- rats and eels, monsters and ghosts.

There is a bronze-age trackway under the Isle of Dogs, Wren found Anglo-Saxon graves under St Paul's, and the monastery of Whitefriars lies beneath Fleet Street. In Kensal Green cemetery there was a hydraulic device to lower bodies into the catacombs below -- "Welcome to the lower depths". A door in the plinth of statue of Boadicea on Westminster Bridge leads to a huge tunnel, packed with cables -- gas, water, telephone. When the Metropolitan Line was opened in 1864 the guards asked for permission to grow beards to protect themselves against the sulphurous fumes, and called their engines by the names of tyrants -- Czar, Kaiser, Mogul -- and even Pluto, god of the underworld.

Going under London is to penetrate history, to enter a hidden world. "The vastness of the space, a second earth," writes Peter Ackroyd, "elicits sensations of wonder and of terror. It partakes of myth and dream in equal measure."
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London: A Biography

By Peter Ackroyd

A masterpiece -- the culmination and distillation of Peter Ackroyd’s lifelong passion for the history and topography of London. Vividly anecdotal and brilliantly original.

Perhaps the most important study of the city ever written, London confirms Ackroyd’s status as what one critic called, “our age’s greatest London imagination.” Much of Peter Ackroyd’s work has been concerned with the life + Read More..
A masterpiece -- the culmination and distillation of Peter Ackroyd’s lifelong passion for the history and topography of London. Vividly anecdotal and brilliantly original.

Perhaps the most important study of the city ever written, London confirms Ackroyd’s status as what one critic called, “our age’s greatest London imagination.” Much of Peter Ackroyd’s work has been concerned with the life and past of London, but this new book is his definitive account of the city. For Ackroyd’s London is a living organism, with its own laws of growth and change, so London is The Biography , as the book is subtitled, not a History. Here Ackroyd portrays London from the time of the Druids to the beginning of the twenty-first century, noting magnificence in each age. But this is not a simple chronological record.

He writes chapters on the history of silence, the history of light, the history of childhood, the history of Cockney speech, and the history of drink. He constructs a comprehensive, multilayered image of the place, animated by his concern for the close relationship between the present and the past, and the peculiar ‘echoic’ quality of London which actively affects the lives and personalities of its citizens.
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The Great Fire of London

By Peter Ackroyd

The Great Fire of London is a novel by the English author Peter Ackroyd.

Published in 1982, it is Ackroyd's first novel. It established themes which Ackroyd returns to again and again in his fiction: London, English literature and the intertwining (and blurring) of literary, historical and contemporary events.
The Great Fire of London is a novel by the English author Peter Ackroyd.

Published in 1982, it is Ackroyd's first novel. It established themes which Ackroyd returns to again and again in his fiction: London, English literature and the intertwining (and blurring) of literary, historical and contemporary events.
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The Lambs of London

By Peter Ackroyd

Mary Lamb is confined by the restrictions of domesticity: her father is losing his mind, her mother watchful and hostile. The great solace of her life is her brother Charles, an aspiring writer. It is no surprise when Mary falls for the bookseller’s son, antiquarian William Ireland, from whom Charles has purchased a book. But this is no + Read More..
Mary Lamb is confined by the restrictions of domesticity: her father is losing his mind, her mother watchful and hostile. The great solace of her life is her brother Charles, an aspiring writer. It is no surprise when Mary falls for the bookseller’s son, antiquarian William Ireland, from whom Charles has purchased a book. But this is no ordinary book — it once belonged to William Shakespeare himself. And William Ireland with his green eyes and red hair is no ordinary young man.

In The Lambs of London, Peter Ackroyd brilliantly creates an urban world of scholars and entrepreneurs, a world in which a clever son will stop at nothing to impress his showman father, and no one knows quite what to believe. Ingenious and vividly alive, The Lambs of London is a poignant, gripping novel of betrayal and deceit.